written by:
photos by:
August 26, 2014
Originally published in Modern Dreams
as
The Art of Compromise
Inspired by their clients’ bold art collection, a pair of architects designs a Hamptons vacation house that subverts tradition.
Hamptons modern pool off gabled house with cedar paneling

Even the pool is the result of mixed influences: Andrew wanted a series of shallow, gently sloping hangout zones; his wife, Amy, a former competitive swimmer, needed a full lane deep enough for laps.

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Hamptons living room with towering head sculpture and metallic fireplace

Andrew Weinstein stands in the living room of his Long Island abode designed by Bates Masi + Architects. The architects toggled wall panels and panes of custom-cut window glass on the front of the house that let in light while leaving room for large-format artwork like Adam Parker Smith’s American Totem.

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Dining room with white lacquer table, Cherner chairs, and a large artwork

A white lacquer Ligne Roset dining table is joined by a wood bench from Room & Board and bent-plywood Cherner chairs. Baconcube 4 by Cindy Wright hangs on the wall.

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Hamptons house exterior with precast concrete panels with wood framing

The gabled house, constructed from precast concrete panels by Superior Walls with wood framing, offers a pared-down suggestion of a traditional New England silhouette. The exterior cedar paneling also appears on the ceiling of the custom-built chef’s kitchen inside.

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Kitchen with white marble countertops and white fiberboard cabinetry

Bates Masi designed the two-inch-thick Carrara marble countertops and white fiberboard cabinetry in the kitchen.

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White stairwell with Jacqueline Kennedy artwork and skylight

In the stairwell hangs a series of 1999 Vik Muniz works that resemble Andy Warhol’s iconic portraits of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, but are actually photographs of pooled ketchup.

 

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Living too with fallen wood table and Hans Wegner chair

Interior designer Danielle Roberts sought practical materials for the living room, such as custom wide-wale upholstery for a CB2 sofa. The fallen-wood coffee table is by St. Louis–based designer David Stine; the chair is by Hans Wegner for Carl Hansen & Søn.

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Hamptons bedroom with glass walls and American flag print

The glass-walled master suite opens to the surrounding forest and gardens and feels totally separate from the children’s and guest bedrooms upstairs.

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Garage of Hamptons house with wooden horizontal stakes

The first-floor exterior walls and fence are clad with horizontal survey stakes, identical to the ones that dotted the lot when the Weinsteins first bought it; the humble picket shapes pull off a graphic effect when collaged en masse. 

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Gabled living room with metallic fireplace

The living room fireplace is tiled with military-issue dog tags.

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Modern wooden outdoor shower

A wood-lined outdoor shower adds a modern touch to one of the decks.

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Hamptons floor plan

Weinstein Residence Floor Plan

A    Entry

B    Bathroom

C    Dining Area

D    Living Area

E    Kitchen

F    Terrace

G    Office

H    Master Bedroom

I    Master Bathroom

J    Outdoor Shower

K    Bedroom

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Hamptons modern pool off gabled house with cedar paneling

Even the pool is the result of mixed influences: Andrew wanted a series of shallow, gently sloping hangout zones; his wife, Amy, a former competitive swimmer, needed a full lane deep enough for laps.

Project 
Weinstein Residence
Interior Designer 

Judging by their art collection, Andrew and Amy Weinstein appear to be unabashed risk-takers. A cartoon phallus, drawn on what looks like a steamed-up mirror, hangs in the bathroom of their Amagansett, New York, vacation home. A 16-foot-tall totem, made of rubber masks and spray foam, holds court in the double-height living room. 

Despite this yen for the subversive in contemporary art, the couple’s architectural choices were, for years, somewhat conventional. When not living in their midcentury co-op on Manhattan’s East Side, the Weinsteins escaped to a shingled 1,050-square-foot cottage on the Atlantic Ocean in Amagansett. When their first child began crawling in 2005, they initially looked into adding a basement playroom and second floor to the house. But when the high water table rendered that impossible—and Amy became pregnant with the couple’s second child—they decided to start over on a roughly two-acre wooded lot a couple of miles inland. The plan was to reinterpret their beloved vintage cottage on a scale large enough to accommodate both their burgeoning family and their art collection—“a house house,” says Amy. “Looking back,” says Andrew, “it was about going with what we knew.” 

Hamptons living room with towering head sculpture and metallic fireplace

Andrew Weinstein stands in the living room of his Long Island abode designed by Bates Masi + Architects. The architects toggled wall panels and panes of custom-cut window glass on the front of the house that let in light while leaving room for large-format artwork like Adam Parker Smith’s American Totem.

But after canvassing the architectural talent on Long Island’s East End—where faux-traditional trophy estates dominate the beachscape—the couple felt uninspired. They finally connected with Paul Masi and Harry Bates of Bates Masi + Architects—in spite of the Sag Harbor firm’s distinctly modern oeuvre. “We were really looking to build a fairly traditional Hamptons cottage,” says Andrew, a criminal defense attorney. “But we fell in love with Paul and Harry as people.” This was, in part, because the architects’ philosophy of design as storytelling reminded the Weinsteins of the artists whose work they collect. “We are drawn to conceptual and process-driven art and less concerned with its ultimate aesthetic,” Andrew adds. “I work in a courtroom with judges and rules, where the thinking can be fairly constricted. Talking and dealing with people who function on a completely different level is a creative outlet for me.” 

The collaboration began as a holistic discussion about how the Weinsteins planned to use the house and how their needs would change as their children, now ten and seven, grew up. “I said, ‘Let’s go into this project not talking about traditional style, but talking about how you live, what inspires you, what you like to do,’” says Masi. The Weinsteins’ desire for relief from their cramped urban life led to an open-plan first floor with a broad deck, floor-to-ceiling sliding doors, and wide expanses of glass uniting inside and out. Their wish to own larger-scale sculptures inspired the double-height ceiling. The front of the living area consists mostly of walls—to optimize art display space—with carefully placed slots of glass to let in light. A glass-walled master suite opens to the surrounding forest and gardens and feels totally separate from the children’s and guest bedrooms upstairs. “The design process was so much more than giving us a set of blueprints,” says Andrew. 

Kitchen with white marble countertops and white fiberboard cabinetry

Bates Masi designed the two-inch-thick Carrara marble countertops and white fiberboard cabinetry in the kitchen.

To integrate traditional and modern elements, the architects took a cue from the Weinsteins’ idiosyncratic art collection, whose recurring theme, if it can be said to have one, is that things are not quite what they seem. “Andrew’s art was unique because it had deeper meaning,” says Masi. “I really liked that multilayered concept.” This line of thought informed what Masi calls the house’s “narrative of discovery” and how the architects repurposed humble and old-fashioned shapes and materials to create something radically different.

From form to finishes, the four-bedroom, 3,400-square-foot house wittily and easily blends old and new. The gabled silhouette, constructed over 18 months using a combination of precast insulated concrete materials and wood framing, offers a
pared-down suggestion of a traditional house while incorporating thoughtful modern details. “When you approach from a distance, you see these very familiar forms,” says Masi. “But as you come closer, you realize that they’re somewhat modified, with material and fabrication details that are unique.” The first-floor exterior walls and fence, for example, are clad with horizontal survey stakes, identical to the ones that dotted the lot when the Weinsteins first bought it; the humble picket shapes pull off a graphic effect when collaged en masse. The chimney appears to be cast from solid concrete but is actually composed of lightweight autoclaved cement panels affixed to a lath system, with screws left exposed. 

Living too with fallen wood table and Hans Wegner chair

Interior designer Danielle Roberts sought practical materials for the living room, such as custom wide-wale upholstery for a CB2 sofa. The fallen-wood coffee table is by St. Louis–based designer David Stine; the chair is by Hans Wegner for Carl Hansen & Søn.

The Weinsteins did get their cherished Hamptons shingles—they lend warmth to the exterior’s upper level—but as the process unfolded, the couple underwent their own transformation, from reluctant modernists to enthusiastic ones. When Masi suggested classic wood-framed doors and windows, the couple instead opted for steel. “There was less and less resistance, and then no resistance, toward anything Paul wanted to do,” says Amy. “By the time we got to the end of the project,” her husband adds, “we were actually pushing them to go more and more modern.”

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