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The project on which Evergreen was seeking help was the development of <a href="http://ebw.evergreen.ca/">Evergreen Brick Works</a>, the adaptive reuse of Toronto's former Don Valley Brick Works brickyard. In the 1960s and 70s, the factory produced more t

Photo
courtesy of
Ben Rahn/A-Frame http://www.aframestudio.com/
Originally appeared in Welcome Hut
on September 27, 2010
The project on which Evergreen was seeking help was the development of &lt;a href=&quot;http://ebw.evergreen.ca/&quot;&gt;Evergreen Brick Works&lt;/a&gt;, the adaptive reuse of Toronto&#039;s former Don Valley Brick Works brickyard. In the 1960s and 70s, the factory produced more t

The project on which Evergreen was seeking help was the development of Evergreen Brick Works, the adaptive reuse of Toronto's former Don Valley Brick Works brickyard. In the 1960s and 70s, the factory produced more than 43 million bricks each year, however, business slowed in the 1980s and the brickyard closed its doors that decade. In 1996, the city of Toronto opened the 12-acre, 16-building site as a park and Evergreen became involved by helping plant wildflowers. Today, the nonprofit runs the site, working to get all 16 buildings back into usable condition to host a farmers' market, the Evergreen administration building, rental space for businesses and other nonprofits, a skating rink, workshop spaces, and more. Photo by Ben Rahn, A-Frame Studio.

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