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Your supplies! The good thing about stocking up is that most of these purchases will last you through a few hardbacks.<br /><br />A firm cardboard. Try <a href="http://www.dickblick.com/products/lineco-acid-free-binders-board/">binder's board</a>, chipboa

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Originally appeared in Bookbinding
on November 1, 2011
Your supplies! The good thing about stocking up is that most of these purchases will last you through a few hardbacks.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;A firm cardboard. Try &lt;a href=&quot;http://www.dickblick.com/products/lineco-acid-free-binders-board/&quot;&gt;binder&#039;s board&lt;/a&gt;, chipboa
Your supplies! The good thing about stocking up is that most of these purchases will last you through a few hardbacks.A firm cardboard. Try binder's board, chipboard, or the covers of an old 3-ring binder.-80lb paper. The amount of sheets depends on how thick you'd like your book to be. We bought a Strathmore 400 Series Drawing Pad, with 24 sheets of 9"x12" paper.-A brush to spread the glue thinly and evenly.-Sharp utility blade (box-cutter or X-Acto will work).-Ruler or measuring tape.-Scissors.-A few sheets of wax paper.-Paper-backed or non-porous cloth, or heavy paper for wrapping the cardboard to form the hardcover. We used Lineco Book Cloth in forest green.-A pencil.-Small awl or chisel.-A swatch of loose weave cloth (cheesecloth works great). You'll be cutting this into a few different pieces, the longest of which needs to be as long as the spine of your book.-Glue. PVA (polyvinyl acetate) glue is usually used in bookbinding because it dries quickly, is flexible, and is also acid-free. However, it is usually a little more expensive. Your standard white craft or school glue should work, too.-Heavy thread/a> and a needle. The thread can be run across a block of beeswax to prevent tangling, but isn't necessary.

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