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Knoll introduced webbing into its chairs in the 1940s. Seen here is Marianne Strengell's Pebble-Weave webbing on a Ralph Rapson rocking chair. "Materials were scarce and wartime restrictions meant Knoll had to come up with innovative solutions," Makovsky

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Originally appeared in Behind the Scenes: Knoll Textiles
on May 26, 2011
Knoll introduced webbing into its chairs in the 1940s. Seen here is Marianne Strengell's Pebble-Weave webbing on a Ralph Rapson rocking chair. "Materials were scarce and wartime restrictions meant Knoll had to come up with innovative solutions," Makovsky
Knoll introduced webbing into its chairs in the 1940s. Seen here is Marianne Strengell's Pebble-Weave webbing on a Ralph Rapson rocking chair. "Materials were scarce and wartime restrictions meant Knoll had to come up with innovative solutions," Makovsky says. "Jens Risom's chair used rejected parachute webbing but the company later went to suppliers to make actual webbing with textures on it. Pebble-Weave was designed by Strengell, who was the head of weaving at Cranbrook. Florence had gone to Cranbrook and Rapson had as well so there was a connection between Knoll and the academy in the early days." Designers like Charles Eames and Harry Bertoia also studied at Cranbrook and Eliel Saarinen (a noted architect and Eero Saarinen's father) was head of the academy at one time.

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