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German weaver Paul Maute's Cato textile ("probably the most famous textile in the Knoll line," Makovsky says) upholsters Eero Saarinen's model 72U side chair (circa 1965). "When I spoke early on with Florence about this exhibition, she explained her philo

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Originally appeared in Behind the Scenes: Knoll Textiles
on May 26, 2011
German weaver Paul Maute's Cato textile ("probably the most famous textile in the Knoll line," Makovsky says) upholsters Eero Saarinen's model 72U side chair (circa 1965). "When I spoke early on with Florence about this exhibition, she explained her philo
German weaver Paul Maute's Cato textile ("probably the most famous textile in the Knoll line," Makovsky says) upholsters Eero Saarinen's model 72U side chair (circa 1965). "When I spoke early on with Florence about this exhibition, she explained her philosophy about designing a good textile. She said you have to think about the people, the furniture, and the atmosphere—not just about the pattern itself," Makovsky says. "By people she meant the client and what they need, what they look like. When you talk about the furniture, if you look at the Saarinen chair, it's not just square but has rounded edges so you have to be careful if you use a patterned textile that the fabric doesn't bunch up. The idea of atmosphere was the most important for Florence. The textile is part of the architectural space and if you have textiles that are handwoven then that adds a very human feeling to the interior space."

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