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Florence Knoll's hand reached beyond textile design and interiors and into showroom design and marketing. "She hated floppy panels hinged to walls that displayed textiles," Makovsky says. "People would be looking at them, flipping through panels, and get

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Originally appeared in Behind the Scenes: Knoll Textiles
on May 26, 2011
Florence Knoll's hand reached beyond textile design and interiors and into showroom design and marketing. "She hated floppy panels hinged to walls that displayed textiles," Makovsky says. "People would be looking at them, flipping through panels, and get
Florence Knoll's hand reached beyond textile design and interiors and into showroom design and marketing. "She hated floppy panels hinged to walls that displayed textiles," Makovsky says. "People would be looking at them, flipping through panels, and get stuck because someone else was flipping them too." She instead upholstered fabrics into rectangular panels that she used as decorative elements throughout the showrooms. The fabric wheel (shown here) was another way to display textiles. "It echos the form of a wheel, which was the same shape used in Richard Shultz's Petal dining table for Knoll, so there was that connection to furniture, advertising, and marketing," Makovsky says.

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