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Shahid spent a short time cycling along this small, local road that followed Hung-Tse Lake. "I was happy riding along this dirt road as a break from the traffic flying by me on the national road that I've been following," she says. Shahid's original plan

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Originally appeared in Cycle China: Week 3
on September 22, 2011
Shahid spent a short time cycling along this small, local road that followed Hung-Tse Lake. "I was happy riding along this dirt road as a break from the traffic flying by me on the national road that I've been following," she says. Shahid's original plan
Shahid spent a short time cycling along this small, local road that followed Hung-Tse Lake. "I was happy riding along this dirt road as a break from the traffic flying by me on the national road that I've been following," she says. Shahid's original plan was to stick to local roads, however, about a day into the trip she discovered that local roads are "just compacted dirt and rutted out in areas," she says. She switched to the national roads, which are one step below main highway arterials and have proven to be very well-maintained, be quite manageable, have relatively low automobile traffic, and have wide shoulders. "Most cars and trucks give a courtesy honk about five to ten seconds before they pass you," she says. "It's loud and obnoxious but it's their way of letting you know they're there. In addition to the honk, they move over a lane to give you more space when they pass."

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