written by:
February 21, 2016
Originally published in Interiors We Love
as
Editor's Letter
Dwell editor-in-chief Amanda Dameron talks us through Dwell's March 2016 issue.
Vintage Danish cabinets and custom table in Antwerp renovation.

An artist and an architect built this 6,000-square-foot creative dreamworld packed with a tropical garden, neon rooms, and more, inside an Antwerp warehouse.

 

Photo by 
Originally appeared in A 6,000-Square-Foot Creative Dreamworld Packed with a Tropical Garden, Neon Rooms, and More
1 / 5
The Shaker-style furniture provides comfort and compliments the exposed structure.

In New York, architecture and interiors firm BarlisWedlick created this eclectic compound designed to suit a client with an idiosyncratic wish list—including a "sauna tower."

 

Photo by 
Originally appeared in A Passive House and "Sauna Tower" Join a 19th-Century Barn in the Hudson Valley
2 / 5
3 / 5
A home office in Portland features colorful built-in bookshelves.

On a whim, a growing family uprooted to Oregon where they found—and remade—this 1959 midcentury home of their dreams.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Wood Paneling Loses its Dated Reputation with This Renovation of a 1959 Portland Gem
4 / 5
Modern Los Angeles loft kitchen renovation with stainless steel cabinets by Fagor, Henry Hall Designs chairs, CB2 benches and farm table

A designer carved out this industrial-chic kitchen in a downtown Los Angeles apartment.

 

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Steel and Brass Cover Nearly Every Surface of this Industrial L.A. Kitchen
5 / 5
Vintage Danish cabinets and custom table in Antwerp renovation.

An artist and an architect built this 6,000-square-foot creative dreamworld packed with a tropical garden, neon rooms, and more, inside an Antwerp warehouse.

 

Interior design is not about arranging furniture. Interior design is about manifesting comfort and pleasure in an environment sheltered from the world at large. It’s about summoning the power of the senses to communicate feelings of safety and ease. Interior design is about creating spaces in which one can live on one’s own terms. 

Think about the most pleasant room you’ve ever encountered—not the most expansive or expensive, mind you, but the most serene and welcoming. Most likely when a space comes to mind, it’s a sensory experience that triggers the memory: perhaps it smelled wonderful, or carried the sound of water, or maybe the furniture was incredibly soft and accommodating, the lighting brilliant or cozily subdued. Whatever the impetus, in that moment, you felt the energy of your surroundings. That’s the power of design. 

A home office in Portland features colorful built-in bookshelves.

On a whim, a growing family uprooted to Oregon where they found—and remade—this 1959 midcentury home of their dreams.

Theorists and historians have long explored the significance of experiencing a structure as a spatial composition, one that is only thoroughly grasped through a series of sensory impressions. We do our own investigation of the concept in this issue, beginning with a short profile on Josef Frank, an intriguingly alternative modernist architect and designer who firmly believed in home as vehicle for psychological comfort. We follow this with a package offering a snapshot of each of the five senses and the unique part each can play within an interior space. Li Edelkoort, a design mind charting both today’s trends and predictions for tomorrow, shares her thoughts. 

Nick and Rachel Cope of Calico Wallpaper, partners in life and work, open the door to their Brooklyn apartment. The pair are rising figures in the design world, specifically for their lyrical, atmospheric wall coverings that seem to be popping up everywhere these days. The way they’ve incorporated not only their own creations but those of their friends and industry peers into a rental property is inspirational for those looking for ways to make their homes more personal and distinctive through interior design without doing irreparable harm to their security deposit. 

The artistry of collecting and assembling disparate objects and materials is masterfully demonstrated in a Paris flat owned by Merci artistic director Daniel Rozensztroch. This is a person that’s made a career of following his own aesthetic impulses to create influential design statements—in retail environments, in shelter publications, and of course, in his own home. The downside of seeing the beauty in the unexpected means that you can end up with an embarrassment of riches, but Rozensztroch proves that a well-ordered interior need not be stark to feel modern. 

The Shaker-style furniture provides comfort and compliments the exposed structure.

In New York, architecture and interiors firm BarlisWedlick created this eclectic compound designed to suit a client with an idiosyncratic wish list—including a "sauna tower."

 

A trio of interior designers in this issue present a trifecta of surprising solutions for vastly different challenges—Andrea Michaelson tackles a downtown Los Angeles loft for a weekend chef who loves to entertain without any fuss; Emily Knudsen Leland of Jessica Helgerson Interior Design delivers a Portland midcentury family home in need of an aesthetic pick-me-up without sacrificing its integrity; and Elaine Santos of BarlisWedlick Architects corrals two wildly divergent sides of one idiosyncratic client into a singular interior for a certified Passive House in Ancram, New York. 

Outside the United States, designers Teresa Sarmiento and Nicolas Tovo worked together to incorporate cast-off materials and other architectural leftovers to create a soothing, unified family home in the middle of bustling Buenos Aires, Argentina. In Antwerp, Belgium, French architect and designer Nathalie Wolberg and her partner, Texas-born artist Tim Stokes, collaborated on an otherworldly living space and gallery that makes extraordinary use of color, light, and textiles. 

We end with a quiet moment in a seaside cottage in Sagaponack, New York, where interior designer James Huniford created a deceptively simple—yet rigorously attained—area for taking meals. Long a proponent of reusing castoff objects and reimagining them as sculptural points of interest, Huniford uses a deep knowledge of historical decorative arts to transcend stylistic tropes. By refusing to adhere to formulaic interiors and eschewing the notion that only the new is worthwhile, Huniford proves himself to be a compatriot to the late Josef Frank whose unique take on modern domestic spaces can be summed up in his well-known adage, “One can use everything that can be used.”

Amanda Dameron, Editor-in-Chief

amanda@dwell.com / @AmandaDameron

Join the Discussion

Loading comments...

Latest Articles

45 dva 2270 persp1 cmyk 0
The prospect of retirement doesn’t just signal the end of a career; it offers the chance to recalibrate and re-prioritize in life.
July 25, 2016
18
You don’t have to choose between sustainable energy and curb appeal.
July 19, 2016
jakemagnus queensland 1
Each week, we tap into Dwell's Instagram community to bring you the most captivating design and architecture shots of the week.
July 06, 2016
content delzresidence 013 1
Each week, we tap into Dwell's Instagram community to bring you the most captivating design and architecture shots of the week.
June 29, 2016
abc malacari marwick stair 01 0
A simple set of stairs is a remodel’s backbone.
June 28, 2016
Design Award of Excellence winner Mellon Square.
Docomomo US announces the winners of this year's Modernism in America Awards. Each project showcases exemplary modern restoration techniques, practices, and ideas.
June 27, 2016
monogram dwell sf 039 1
After last year’s collaboration, we were excited to team up with Monogram again for the 2016 Monogram Modern Home Tour.
June 27, 2016
switch over chicago smart renovation penthouse deck smar green ball lamps quinze milan lounge furniture garapa hardwood
A strategic rewire enhances a spec house’s gut renovation.
June 26, 2016
young guns 2016 emerging talent coralie gourguechon treviso italy cphotos by coralie gourguechon co produced by isdat planche anatomique de haut parleur1
Coralie Gourguechon's paper objects will make you see technology in a whole new way.
June 26, 2016
green machine smart home aspen colorado facade yard bocci deck patio savant
Smart technology helps a house in Aspen, Colorado, stay on its sustainable course.
June 25, 2016
Compact Aglol 11 television plastic brionvega.
The aesthetic appeal of personal electronics has long fueled consumer interest. A new industrial design book celebrates devices that broke the mold.
June 25, 2016
modern backyard deck ipe wood
An angled deck transforms a backyard in Menlo Park, California, into a welcoming gathering spot.
June 24, 2016
dscf5485 1
Today, we kicked off this year’s annual Dwell on Design at the LA Convention Center, which will continue through Sunday, June 26th. Though we’ve been hosting this extensive event for years, this time around is particularly special.
June 24, 2016
under the radar renovation napa
Two designers restore a low-slung midcentury gem in Napa, California, by an unsung Bay Area modernist.
June 24, 2016
Exterior of Huneeus/Sugar Bowl Home.
San Francisco–based designer Maca Huneeus created her family’s weekend retreat near Lake Tahoe with a relaxed, sophisticated sensibility.
June 24, 2016
light and shadow bathroom walnut storage units corian counter vola faucet
A Toronto couple remodel their home with a special emphasis on a spacious kitchen and a material-rich bathroom.
June 24, 2016
Affordable home in Kansas City living room
In Kansas City, an architecture studio designs an adaptable house for a musician on a budget.
June 23, 2016
modern lycabettus penthouse apartment oak vertical slats office
By straightening angles, installing windows, and adding vertical accents, architect Aaron Ritenour brought light and order to an irregularly shaped apartment in the heart of Athens, Greece.
June 23, 2016
kitchen confidential tiles custom cabinetry oak veneer timber house
A modest kitchen addition to a couple’s cottage outside of Brisbane proves that one 376-square-foot room can revive an entire home.
June 23, 2016
feldman architecture 0
Each week, we tap into Dwell's Instagram community to bring you the most captivating design and architecture shots of the week.
June 22, 2016
Blackened timber Dutch home
A modern dwelling replaces a fallen farmhouse.
June 22, 2016
hillcrest house interior kitchen 3
Seeking an escape from bustling city life, a Manhattan couple embarks on a renovation in the verdant Hudson Valley.
June 22, 2016
angular
Atelier Moderno renovated an old industrial building to create a luminous, modern home.
June 21, 2016
San Francisco floating home exterior
Anchored in a small San Francisco canal, this floating home takes its cues from a classic city habitat.
June 21, 2016
modern renovation addition solar powered scotland facade steel balcony
From the bones of a neglected farmstead in rural Scotland emerges a low-impact, solar-powered home that’s all about working with what was already there.
June 21, 2016
up in the air small space new zealand facade corrugated metal cladding
An architect with a taste for unconventional living spaces creates a small house at lofty heights with a starring view.
June 21, 2016
young guns 2016 emerging talent marjan van aubel london cwai ming ng current window
Marjan Van Aubel makes technology a little more natural.
June 21, 2016
urban pastoral brooklyn family home facade steel cypress double
Building on the site of a former one-car garage, an architect creates his family’s home in an evolving neighborhood of Brooklyn.
June 20, 2016
Modern Brooklyn backyard studio with plexiglass skylight, green roof, and cedar cladding facade
In a Brooklyn backyard, an off-duty architect builds a structure that tests his attention to the little things.
June 20, 2016
the outer limits paris prefab home living area vertigo lamp constance guisset gijs bakker strip tablemetal panels
In the suburbs of Paris, an architect with an eco-friendly practice doesn’t let tradition stand in the way of innovation.
June 20, 2016